Mini Lentil-Banana Pancakes

Want an easy way to make pancakes for your children without the fuss of frying them on the stove? Try these protein packed Mini Lentil-Banana Pancakes. Great for breakfast or as a snack on the go!

Recipe by: DietitianMom

Makes 36 mini pancakes (2 inches in diameter each)

Ingredients:

  • ½ cup mashed or pureed cooked red lentils (drained well)
  • 3 small ripe bananas, mashed
  • ½ cup + 1 tablespoon fortified plant-based milk
  • 1/2 cup sifted all purpose or whole wheat flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 3 tablespoons oil
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar (can substitute with honey, maple syrup or agave nectar)

Supplies: silicon muffin cups, small pot, mixing bowl, baking tray

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees F (230 degrees C).
  2. Rinse a half cup of dry red lentils with water in a small pot. Drain the excess water, then refill the pot with about 2 cups of water. Heat on a medium stove fire setting until pot contents are on a gentle boil. Turn down the fire and let contents cook with a gentle bubbling boil for about 10-15 minutes. You can taste a spoonful of the lentils at the end to check if they are cooked soft. Once the lentils are cooked through, turn off the fire. Remove the cooked lentils from the pot using a slotted spoon into a separate bowl. Measure out ½ a cup of cooked lentils into a separate mixing bowl. Make sure the lentils are drained really well first of any excess cooking liquid.
  3. Into this same mixing bowl with the lentils, mash the bananas, plant-based milk, sifted flour, baking powder, oil and brown sugar. You may add a little bit more plant-based milk if needed. The goal is to create a pancake batter thickness.
  4. Place all the silicon muffin cups onto a baking tray, then spoon a tablespoon of the batter into each silicon muffin cup.
  5. Bake the silicon cups in the oven for about 10-12 minutes (or until your desired level of crispness). Take out the baking tray and then remove the cooked mini-pancakes from the muffin cups onto a plate to further cool (and harden) for about 10 minutes or so. Ready to serve!
  6. Replace the silicon muffin cups onto the baking tray and repeat the process until all the batter has been cooked.

Tips: You could try substituting some of the all purpose flour with whole wheat flour. You could also substitute the sugar with honey, maple syrup or agave nectar and adjust the amount added to your desired level of sweetness. The key is to put no more than a tablespoon at the bottom of each silicon muffin cup.

These Mini Lentil-Banana Pancakes taste great as leftovers cold or heated, or thawed and warmed up from the freezer. If you don’t have silicon muffin cups, you could use regular muffin cups, but the pancakes may stick slightly to the paper muffin cups. Another option is just to grease a tin muffin tray and put the batter directly into each muffin mold.

Alternatively, if you have a big silicon cake mold, you could use that to put a thin layer of the batter and then bake it, to make bigger pancake size pieces, or slice it into smaller pieces. Share your comments if you make this recipe! Bon appétit!

 

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Qn of the Month: Do Different Brands of Baby Cereal Provide the Same Nutrition?

A: No! Although there are some similarities, there appears to be more differences between different brands of baby cereal products, even between different brand products of the same type of cereal.  How so? Read on.

Generally all infant cereals are fortified in certain nutrients such as iron, thiamine, riboflavin and niacin. Baby cereal products also contain (per serving) similar amounts of macronutrients such as calories, carbohydrates, fats and protein. However, major differences exist. For example, in Canada, Nestle Gerber’s® baby oat infant cereal provides in a (5 tablespoons or 28 grams) serving the following: 15% Daily Value (DV) of calcium, 60% DV of vitamin B12, 100% DV of iron and 0 grams of fiber. But a comparable (1/3 cup or 30 grams) serving of Heinz’s baby oat cereal provides more iron (110% of DV iron), 4 times the amount of calcium (60% DV of calcium), 2 grams of fiber but absolutely no vitamin B12! Not only that, Nestle Gerber’s® baby oat infant cereal contains in a serving 30% DV of biotin, 15% DV of iodide, 15 % DV of zinc and 30% DV of magnesium. However, a similar serving size of Heinz’s baby oat cereal contains no biotin or iodide, only 6% DV of zinc and halfthe quantity of magnesium (15% DV)! It appears that Heinz’sbaby oat cereal is a really good source of iron and calcium per serving, but not so much of the other nutrients.

For plant-based mums, be aware that though you would expect infant cereal to be vegan or vegetarian, that may not be the case. In fact, both the Nestle Gerber’s® baby oat infant cereal and Heinz’s baby oat cereal contain dry skim milk as part of the ingredients! So the next time you go shopping, make sure to check the nutrition facts panel of the infant baby cereal you are planning to buy, to see what nutrition your baby will really be getting from consuming that particular product!

Qn of the Month: Intakes of Baby-Led Weaning Infants & Traditional Spoon Feed Infants – Are There Nutritional Differences?

Pureed or Baby Led? - Dietitianmom.com

Pureed or Baby Led? – Dietitianmom.com

A: Yes, according to a study published in the British Medical Journal. Led by Morison and colleagues, this New Zealand based study looked at the intake of 51 age-matched and sex-matched infants at 6-8 months of age. One to three day weighted food records and questionnaires were collected from those in the baby led weaning (BLW) group and those in the traditional spoon feeding (TSF) group, which were then analyzed. The result? It was found that while infants in both groups had relatively similar caloric intake, those in the BLW group may be consuming higher fat and higher saturated fat intakes, along with possibly lower iron, zinc and vitamin B12 intakes.

Although the research finding results are exciting, it is important to note the strengths and limitations of the study. Strengths include analysis done by a registered dietitian blinded to which group an infant belonged to, the use of weighted food records and detailed questionnaires, and the age and sex matching of infants. The limitations of this study however include the fact that a small sample size was used, the use of estimated breast milk volumes, and the fact that there was no standard definition or classification used in the study of what constituted a baby led weaning infant.

As mentioned in my previous post on BLW (Qn of the Month: How is Baby Led Weaning (BLW) Really Defined?), research on BLW is complicated by the fact that there is no standardized definition of baby led weaning, with research studies using different definitions. In this study, parents self-reported and classified themselves which group their infant fell into. Also, the lower iron intake levels observed in the BLW group compared to the TSF group may be due to the fact that the BLW infants consumed less iron fortified infant cereals, and were breastfed for much longer (approximately 8 more weeks) than TSF infants. Hence infants in the BLW group would have received less iron fortified infant formula.

It is unclear whether this study looked at the potential differences in nutrients contributed by use of iron fortified infant formula and breast milk intake, which could have a big impact on the final nutrient intake of infants in either group.  Also, since estimated breast milk volumes were used, this study cannot accurately determine the exact differences in caloric and iron intake levels between the BLW and the TSF groups. A future study needs to not only control for potential confounding in terms of the length of breastfeeding in both groups, but may also need to include biochemical tests to determine more accurately the iron status of infants in both groups.

 (Sources:

  1. University of Otago. “Dietary intake differs in infants who follow baby-led weaning.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 May 2016. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/05/160517094206.htm. Accessed Nov 26, 2016.
  1. Morison BJ, Taylor RW, Haszard JJ, et al. How different are baby-led weaning and conventional complementary feeding? A cross-sectional study of infants aged 6–8 months. BMJ Open 2016;6:e010665. http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/6/5/e010665. Accessed November 26, 2016.)

Qn of the Month: What Are Ways to Cook Beets?

A: For those who are unfamiliar with this supernutritious plant, there are actually a myriad of ways to cook beets, or the taproot portion of the beet plant. These include the following methods:

  • Steaming it and applying a bit of butter and salt
  • Adding it into soups
  • Eating thin raw slices as part of a salad
  • Blending it with juice (e.g., a beets, apple and carrot combination)
  • Incorporating it into Asian soups (e.g., make a beets soup with carrot, red dates and pork ribs)
  • Incorporating it into western soups: For example, chicken soup (chicken, potatos, carrots, onions, beets) or borscht soup (cabbage, beets, dill, onion etc.)
  • My toddler loves having the beets juices (from steaming) added to her rice to make ‘pink rice’!
  • Add a bit of the beets juice to your baby’s solids as well for added nutrition, or even blend down the steamed beets to make a healthy vegetable puree

Some additional Cooking Tips:

  • It might be a good idea to wear gloves when peeling and cutting this root vegetable to avoid staining your hands. Alternatively, wash your hands and the cutting board as soon as you can after cutting and peeling the vegetable.
  • For a shorter steaming time, cut the beets into as thin slices as you can.
  • Although beets can be added into soups for extra flavor and nutrition, be prepared that it will turn your soup a pinkish tinge!

I was pleasantly surprised to find that the cost of beets at the store was not as expensive as I thought. A bunch of beets (3 beets with the attached leaves and stems) was about $3.79 Canadian dollars. This could be because it was still summer/fall at the time I first bought them, so the costs were lower. I cooked the leaves and stems, and still had the beets for 2-3 side dishes over the course of the next few weeks.

Store beets in the fridge and it will keep for about 1-2 weeks (depending on how fresh these were when you first bought them). If you chop off the stalks (leaving about an inch remaining at the top of the beetroot), then cook the beetroot in boiling water for 20-30 minutes or until cooked through, you will also be able to then peel and slice them to freeze and use at a later date!

 Kitchen Spotlight: Apples

In this “Kitchen Spotlight” post, we’ll take a snapshot look at an all-time American (and likely around the world in other countries) favorite: apples. Apples are a good source of soluble and insoluble fiber and contain phytochemicals (an example would be flavonoids such as quercetin). Carbohydrates are the main macronutrient, but apples also contain quite an array of micronutrients such as vitamin C, B vitamins, vitamin A and E, calcium, iron, potassium, zinc and fatty acids – though all in very minute amounts. A general comparison of the nutrient profile of a medium apple with and without skin on shows that an apple with skin has roughly 2 grams more fiber than the alternative, and packs just a little bit more of certain nutrients such as vitamins A, E, and K.  However, choose your apples carefully. Due to high pesticide levels found in U. S. grown apples, it is best to go with New Zealand grown apples and/or organic varieties where possible. ConsumerReports has found that while washing apples well in water will help reduce some of the surface pesticide residues, peeling may not be as effective as most think in reducing pesticide load (see source citation below for more information).

As it turns out, apples shine in the kitchen too by being versatile cooking ingredients. Although we tend to think of just apple pies, apple crisps and candied apples, apples can actually be incorporated into a variety of other ‘non-dessert’ recipe food items. Here are 5 lesser known ways you can use apples in your food:

  • Combine fresh apple slices or frozen diced versions with roasted or sautéed vegetables (e.g., root vegetables, cabbage or Brussel sprouts)
  • Instead of syrups, use a chunky applesauce or make your own version of a lightly sweetened diced apple topping to use on breakfast pancakes, waffles or French toast
  • Blend unsweetened applesauce into squash or potato soups or mash unsweetened applesauce into sweet potatoes
  • Combine with meats such as apple slices on top of roasted pork loins for added flavor or mix unsweetened applesauce into a meatloaf
  • Reduce the fat content in baked recipes by substituting some of the fat from butter with applesauce or apple butter (e.g., gingerbread, quick bread, muffins, breakfast bars)

So the next time you pick up an apple, take a moment to think about where it’s from, and how you’ll use it in the kitchen!

(Sources:

Arsenic & Rice (Part 3): What Are Others Saying About It?

To eat or not to eat? - Dietitianmom.com

To eat or not to eat? – Dietitianmom.com

In the 3rd part of this series, we will examine the positions and recommendations from a few other sources. First, the concern of arsenic in rice drinks is not a new one. As early as 2003, the Food Standards Agency (FSA) in the United Kingdom has been conducting surveys regarding levels of arsenic in rice and rice products. In February 2009, they released key results in a food survey information sheet regarding arsenic in rice drinks. It was found that arsenic was detected in all samples of rice drinks at low concentrations. Hence FSA advised against using rice milk to substitute for breast milk or for cow’s milk infant formulas for toddlers and young children who are 4.5 years of age and under. This recommendation is not only for nutritional reasons as rice milk is nutritionally inadequate compared to breastmilk or infant formula, but also to reduce arsenic exposure and intake by young children.

In November 2 014, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) provided some advice regarding the use of infant rice cereal for infants and older children who need this due to special needs including dysphagia or gastroesophageal reflux. The AAP’s interim advice is that oatmeal can be used as a preferred thickener instead of rice cereal. This can be done through the use of infant oatmeal cereal. For older children, cornstarch or gum based thickeners can be suitable alternatives.

More recently, in January 2015, the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) released some guidelines and recommendations regarding the issue of arsenic in rice. In the report, it is stated that inorganic arsenic is considered a

“first level carcinogen because long-term exposure is associated with increased risk for various carcinomas including skin, bladder, lung, kidney, liver, and prostrate. Furthermore, exposure is also associated with alterations in gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, hematological, pulmonary, neurological, immunological and reproductive/developmental function”.

Further, infants and children may be more susceptible to toxic effects, with a “higher exposure reported to be associated with increased infant morbidity and mortality and impaired development“. The ESPGHAN Committee on Nutrition caution that rice, especially rice bran, contains high levels of inorganic arsenic, and rice drinks should not be used in infants and young children. This group also encourages a wide consumption of different grains in the diet to reduce inorganic arsenic exposure from food, such as oat, barley, wheat, maize and rice.

All this serves to show that the issue of arsenic in rice is a real one, and one worth noting. There will likely be more data and guidelines out in the near future, especially from the United States Food and Drug Administration, so keep watching this topic. In the meantime, there are many action steps that you as a consumer and parent can already take for yourself and your child [see posts on Arsenic & Rice (Part 2): Action Steps You Can Take Right NOW and Qn of the Month: How Can I Reduce the Arsenic Content of Rice Through Cooking?]!

 

(Sources:
AAP Arsenic in Rice Expert Work Group. AAP group offers advice to reduce infants’ exposure to arsenic in rice. American Academy of Pediatrics. http://aapnews.aappublications.org/content/35/11/13.1.full. Accessed July 20, 2015.

Food Standards Agency. Survey of total and inorganic arsenic in rice drinks. Food Survey Information Sheet 02/09. http://tna.europarchive.org/20140306205048/http://www.food.gov.uk/science/research/surveillance/fsisbranch2009/survey0209. Accessed July 20, 2015.

Hojsak I, Braegger C, Bronsky J et al. ESPGHAN Committee on Nutrition. Arsenic in rice: a cause for concern. JPGN 2015;60: 142–145. http://www.espghan.org/fileadmin/user_upload/guidelines_pdf/Hep_Nutr/arsenic_in_rice.pdf. Accessed July 20, 2015.)

Qn of the Month: How Can I Reduce the Arsenic Content of Rice Through Cooking?

homemaderice2

Cooking Rice to Reduce Arsenic Levels – dietitianmom.com

A: One of the ways to reduce the arsenic content of rice prior to consumption is through cooking.  Here is the rice cooking method that both FDA and Consumer Reports suggest to help reduce the final arsenic content in cooked rice: Cook one cup of rice in 5-6 cups of water. Note that you would need to use a big pot to cook the rice on the stove if you employ this method. Apparently this is a traditional method of cooking rice, but it does produce a more watery product. Based on experience, I recommend the following to minimize the water content of the cooked rice and reduce its sogginess:

  • Using a big pot (a pasta drainer pot with holes in the lid works great!), rinse and wash 1 cup of rice. Then add 5-6 cups of water.
  • Bring water in the pot to a boil on medium heat with the cover on. Once the water starts to boil, turn down the fire so that the pot is just simmering and cover the pot again. Set the timer for 15-20 minutes.
  • Once the timer is up, take a spoon to check and taste to see whether the rice is done. If it is, immediately turn off the fire, and drain as much of the excess liquid from the pot as you can.
  • Then let the pot sit uncovered for at least 5-10 minutes to allow further excess moisture to evaporate.

Optimal cooking times can vary depending on the type of rice you use (e.g., brown rice versus white rice, short grain versus long grain). In general, brown rice will take a bit longer than white rice to cook through. To help reduce cooking time for brown rice, soak it beforehand for a few hours in cold water, then discard the water prior to rinsing the rice. Also, feel free to increase the number of cups of rice you cook at one time depending on your family’s size. Just add the corresponding ratio of water prior to cooking and know that the overall cooking time will need to be extended.

Note also that even if you use these steps above to prepare your rice, the cooked rice will still turn out a bit ‘wet’ or soggy, so you may have to get used to the change in texture over time. It would also be helpful to rinse the rice a few times in water before beginning the cooking process. Although rinsing and cooking the rice in excess water will inevitably lower its nutritional content (especially as rice grain products in the United States are often enriched with iron, folate, thiamin and niacin), it may be well worth it if the arsenic content of the rice could possibly be reduced by as much as 50 percent! Plus, any amount of B vitamins and folate lost through this cooking method can likely be made up quite easily through certain other foods consumed.

(Sources:
Questions & Answers: Arsenic in Rice and Rice Products. US Food and Drug Administration. http://www.fda.gov/food/foodborneillnesscontaminants/metals/ucm319948.htm. Updated August 4, 2014. Accessed June 19, 2015.

How Much Arsenic is in Your Rice. http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine/2015/01/how-much-arsenic-is-in-your-rice/index.htm. November 2014. Accessed June 19, 2015.)