Green Lentils

Red, brown, green, black…lentil varieties abound, and so do their usefulness in recipes. In general, each tablespoon of cooked lentils provides about 1 gram of protein and 1 gram of fiber, and a 1/2 cup of cooked lentils gives about 3.3 milligrams of iron. Lentils are a good source of phosphorus, potassium and folate too.…

Green Beans

Also known as snap beans, wax beans or string beans, green beans usually abound in the spring season, though better quality crops can be grown in the fall season. Green beans can be further sub-categorized into ‘pole beans’ or ‘bush beans’ depending on whether they require poles for support during growth or not. Long, skinny…

Cooking 101: How To Prepare & Use Dry Beans

Cooking with dried beans is easy and more economical than buying canned beans (which often contain salt as part of the ingredients). It just takes a little time. You can often buy a big bag of dried beans that will make double or triple the amount of cooked beans. In practice when I work with…

Broccoli Raab

Many names refer to this green cruciferous vegetable, so it is easy to get confused. Examples include broccoli raab, broccoli rabe, Chinese broccoli, rapine, rapini, turnip broccoli and rappi (to just name a few) but they all actually refer to the same vegetable. Broccoli raab comes with green flowery like leaves, small florets that resemble…

What Are Ways to Cook Beets?

For those who are unfamiliar with this supernutritious plant, there are actually a myriad of ways to cook beets, or the taproot portion of the beet plant. These include the following methods: Steaming it and applying a bit of butter and salt Adding it into soups Eating thin raw slices as part of a salad…

Kitchen Spotlight: Okra

In this “Kitchen Spotlight” post, we’ll move South and take a look at a favorite staple: Okra. Usually recognized by its green exterior, and sticky or slimy texture when cooked, few are aware that okra can come in red and purple colors as well. It is native to Africa, and there are nearly 20 different…

What’s in Chia?

Chia seeds are tiny small black and white seeds, but nutrient rich. A member of the mint family, these were once cultivated by The Aztecs. It is native to central and southern Mexico and Guatemala and is still widely used there. First, what’s the nutritional profile of a serving of chia seeds (equivalent to about…

 Kitchen Spotlight: Apples

  In this “Kitchen Spotlight” post, we’ll take a snapshot look at an all-time American (and likely around the world in other countries) favorite: apples. Apples are a good source of soluble and insoluble fiber and contain phytochemicals (an example would be flavonoids such as quercetin). Carbohydrates are the main macronutrient, but apples also contain…